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Faith Goals
AUTHOR
Mark  »

Integrity. My faith goal or rather the goal of my faith is to achieve and maintain integrity of the Word and my deeds. The objectives to achieve this goal of integrity; doing, saying, and acting with consistency and in accord with the mandates of Christ, as I see it, are as follows:

Be a doer of the Word and not just a hearer (James 2:20 & James 1:19-27)
Be neighborly (Luke 10:29-37)
Do Mercy (Matthew 25:31-46)
Minimize myself and maximize others (John 3:30 & John 12:20-36)
Be attentive (Luke 10:38-42)
Be sacramental (Luke 4:16-21 & John 13:1-20)

In light of faith, I must remember that the only hill I should be willing to die on, is not a social media argument, political entanglement, or some passing triviality, but rather the hill that Jesus taught the Beatitudes from that’s where I stake my claim. That Sermon on the Mount articulates who Christ is, what the Church is, and the mission we all have in this faith. May I have integrity to accept, believe, practice, and do this mission – live this faith.  And when I fail, may I examine my conscience, seek forgiveness, and do better. Amen!

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Cenacle Spirituality
AUTHOR
Mark  »

To surrender to God is not to give up; to trust in Jesus is not an abdication of responsibility; to be vulnerable is not to be confused with self-pity or certitude of pain; to go on retreat is not an escape from reality but is rather an entering into the real presence of the Good God.

The spiritual gift of Mother Therese Couderc lives on within the Cenacle family: Sisters, Auxiliaries and Affiliates, staff and co-ministers, retreatants and friends. Her earthly life ended in 1885, but her influence and insights live-on. She gave retreats, gardened, taught religion, dealt with demotion and illness. Most importantly, I think, she provided welcome – hospitality – because in prayer and simple service she saw that goodness was written all around and in every person. She did not give up or give in to set backs, accusations, or illness. She surrendered to God.

I’m not sure which is more difficult today: seeing Goodness around us or surrendering to God? Which is more difficult is a moot point. Thanks to Mother Therese and her example in post-Revolution France, no matter what is most difficult we know that the yolk of Jesus is light and hospitality and simple service suffice.

 

“Not my will be done, but [God’s]. That is my favorite prayer which I mean to pray every day as long as there is breath left in me, because it is the one which gives me and leaves me with the greatest peace of soul.” – Letter to Mother Marie Aimee Lautier, October 16, 1881

 

“Surrender myself, that is all I did during this retreat – the good God did all the rest.” – Letter to Mother de Larochenegly, February 13, 1864

 

“I abandon myself sincerely to God’s will and good pleasure, and when I have sincerely made this act of abandonment, I am calm and I experience a great peace.” – Letter to Mother de Larochenegly, November 25, 1875

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The Room Where It Happens
AUTHOR
Mark  »

In the play Hamilton, Aaron Burr pleads, “I wanna be in the room where it happens, the room where it happens.”  This private space is the place of power and deal making where insiders conspire.  The ambitious aspire to be one of the brokers there.

For the past century, the Cenacle has offered a different kind of space.  At the heart of the Sisters’ ministry has always been the inspiration of the Upper Room (the Cenacle).  The Cenacle is the room where Jesus joined with his friends in the Last Supper, where he gave them an example of selfless service by washing their feet.  It is also where the disciples awaited in prayer the coming of the Holy Spirit at Pentecost. The Cenacle is a place of quiet expectation, of communion and of transformation.

At the retreat center in Chicago and at similar others throughout the world, the Cenacle Sisters offer a spiritual and physical place, a “room where it happens.”  What happens, though, is quite different from what Burr was after.  What happens is the opportunity for deep encounter, personal discovery, awakening to one’s true self, meeting God in prayer.  A respite from the headlong pace and screen-filled diversion of our lives, the Cenacle offers an invaluable gift – time and space for quiet reflection, a room where nothing and everything happens.

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Power of Yes
AUTHOR
Jill  »

On the first Saturday of September sisters, family and friends gathered at Chicago Cenacle to celebrate the ministry and presence of Sr. Jean Reardon’s Golden Jubilee. While preparing for her celebration, Sr. Jean opened up about the many paths she took that led her to this extraordinary moment. 

Her journey began in 1935 in Albuquerque, New Mexico where she was born. Her father who served in the National Guard in New Mexico was activated in spring of 1941 just months before Pearl Harbor.  That August, he was deployed to the Philippines and was later captured during WWII where he was held as a prisoner of war for two years. After his release and later military retirement he went on to become an educator and school principal in Albuquerque.

Jean followed in her father’s footsteps completing her studies in elementary education at the University of New Mexico. During a long layover in Chicago in her senior year of college, she thought it would be a wonderful idea to visit her priest cousin who lived in Oak Park, IL. While visiting they discussed her trip and her on campus volunteer work with UNM Newman Center. He asked if she had ever considered entering a convent, and her response was a resounding “you have got to be kidding me, NO!” After she returned to campus, she put the question out her mind but not far from her heart. While she was completing her teaching training, a friend who was a Naval Officer and member of her social sorority met her for coffee. Like most young adults their conversation was flooded with all their hopes, dreams and next big steps in life. While sharing her Naval Officer friend asked “would you consider joining the Navy?” In one breath Sr. Jean replied “No! I always swore I would never join the military or marry anyone in the military”. After being the child of a service man and having knowledge of what it entails, she decided early on it was not something she wanted for herself.

Now preparing to head into her career, young Jean soon met an officer who began teaching at the school where she was completing her teaching training.  She found herself impressed by the way the officer integrated her service experience into her teaching and brought the class lessons to life. As she taught the children how to read, the books became more than just a simplified lesson of “see dick run”, but small adventures in front of their eyes. Sr. Jean says “I knew if I wanted to be a good teacher I needed some experience, some adventure.” So, on July 1st, 1957 Sr. Jean reported to Officer Candidate School for Women.

During her 12 years of military service she remained devoted in her faith.  Jean made attending Trinity Sunday a priority, even if she was not able to make other services throughout the month. One Sunday two weeks before Trinity Sunday Jean made her way to chapel. She remembers dipping fingers into the pond of holy water, and she heard a voice say “go to confession and communion today”. “I only do confession and communion on Trinity Sunday” she said to herself. In that moment of reluctance, she knew she didn’t want to be disobedient to God’s clear direction and went on to confession and communion. That moment of hesitation gave way to spiritual conviction and she grew from it. Months later after visiting a local parish in Virginia she heard the voice again say “I want you Jean”. Overwhelmed with fear and much hesitation she started bargaining with God. “Anything but that, I will teach CCD (Confraternity of Christian Doctrine) but not that” she responded. So, she did just that! She began teaching CCD on her base, and as she rose through the ranks so did her faith.

 Jean followed her heart and in 1969 she entered the Cenacle. Sr. Jean has since worked and served in many capacities through the years from the kitchen, to treasure, to ministry coordinator. Her volunteer work allowed her to share her creativity from teaching wood shop at the YMCA summer camp, to being the sister’s in house photographer. Nowadays Sr. Jean spends her afternoons serving in the Cenacles Prayer Enrollment Office. On occasion she gifts bookmarks to the sisters and staff with images she has captured displaying the full beauty of God in this world. “When asked what has been the best part about being a part of the Cenacle for the past 50 years?” Sr. Jean replied “I enjoy the work I do, from walking alongside a retreatant to prayer enrollment, people trust us with their prayers. I believe when we hear others we hear God”. All those years ago in that Virginia parish she turned away from her call and said “no”. With an obedient “yes” later, we now celebrate her 50 years of faith. Sr. Jean continues to remain in awe of God’s grace and has learned to let go into the mystery and say yes to God’s call!

 What would "Yes" lead you to in your life?

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